WordCamp In Africa – Learning Growing Collaboration Influencing

My Quest To Teach

WordCamp In Africa – Learning Growing Collaboration Influencing
William Jackson, M.Ed. My Quest To Teach

William Jackson of My Quest top Teach
William Jackson of My Quest top Teach

2018 and 2019 have seen a rapid expansion of WordCamp conferences in
Africa, from the southern portions of this magnificent continent to the
northern edges. People globally are missing the awesome growth in
technology that is happening in Africa.
WordCamp conferences can be found growing and thriving, opening
doors for new digital collaborations, business ventures, enabling and
empowering African entrepreneurs to share their Brands and build
new Niches and partnerships. Africans of younger generations are
seeing that is it better to collaborate than to compete and get the
influence of how digital media can influence politics, education and
social issues.
As a blogger the digital impressions expand based on your engagement
can influence people around our globe. WordCamp allows rapid and
sustainable digital growth. Content creation is only limited by the
access to wifi which is still sporadic in some area. There are creative
minds that apply what is learned at WordCamp conferences and the
growing number of Kid Camp and Youth Camp conferences.
So involved are Kids and Youth Camps there is success seen in as
new business are starting because of access and engagement.
Kids Camp and Youth Camp conferences have dynamic and engaging
curriculums created by African digital innovators.
WordCamp is a casual environment where information is shared
related to WordPress. WP is a free and open source personal publishing
application that powers over 40% of the web.
The continued immersion of Africa will rapidly increase these numbers.
In 2019 there are  several  African WordCamp conferences ready to
host bloggers, coders, content developers, entrepreneurs, consultants,
business owners and others that are involved in many areas of tech
and Social Media.
Experience does not matter at the WordCamp conference, everyone’s
opinions, ideas and passions are valued and appreciated.
Each conference builds relevant discussions and information is
applicable immediately during and after the conference. Networking
is formidable because real people with real careers, professions,
businesses, and real dreams are present to share and help others.
Mentors in multiple areas can be found and the growing number
of Internships helps to provide youth and teens with real world
opportunities to apply and learn skills to build on.
The conference sessions are a variety of formats from lectures,
presentations, speed talks, or lightning presentations, panels
and interviews. Presentations are diverse sessions that
incorporate slides and videos that can be accessed from the
presenters web site or through WordCamp channel on
http://WordPress.tv after the conference.
African business owners and entrepreneurs are learning that
their social media content should drive people to their web sites
to encourage building business relationships and collaborations.
The continent of Africa is becoming smaller because the increase
in digital wireless access. Equipment is changing to address the
needs of the youth, teens and young adults that are demanding
digital speeds  that support the influences of digital content.
Future WC conferences for 2019
WC Cape Town
https://2019.capetown.wordcamp.org/

WC Johannesburg
https://2019.johannesburg.wordcamp.org/

WC Harare
https://2019.harare.wordcamp.org/

Africans, Use Digital Technologies To Tell Your Own Stories

Let Me Be Great

Africans, Use Digital Technologies To Tell Your Own Stories
by William Jackson, My Quest To Teach
Africans need to tell their own stories especially in the age of
digital technology, Social Media, Apps and other digital
platforms. The flexibility of digital tools opens doors to sharing
content and inspiring dreams. Blogging, Podcasting, Microblogging,
Vblogging and other platforms like SnapChat are resources to
share diverse content.
African stories need to be told authentically.

The Continent of Africa
The Continent of Africa

Chinua Achebe states in his book “Home and Exile,” “until the
lion produces their own historian, the story of the hunt will
glorify only the hunter.” Digital technologies allow African youth
to be storytellers and create their own digital foundations to be
followed by those that share similar passions and interests.

This blog is hoped to encourage, inspire, ignite the flames of
passion to share the words that burn in the hearts of African
storytellers. Many people of the African Diaspora teach their
children the value of storytelling, the purpose of verbal exchanges
that share cultural history, family unity, and historical knowledge
handed down decades and centuries. I love to read the
stories of Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka and others.

They help build a mindset for storytelling and transferring to
the written word. Africans during colonization were denied through
threats, beatings and even death the opportunity to share the stories
of kingdoms of prosperity and educational achievements. Africa had
great universities before Europe and studied science, mathematics,
astronomy and biology. Our STEAM educational strategies are
based on past successes by Africans.

Because of these achievements and more, Africans should be proud
of their heritage and have a drive to extend beyond the colonization
of foreign powers even today.  Achebe describes the “text book act,”
where Nigerian children could not read at a certain time of day and
were not allow to read certain books that showed Africans as leaders,
explorers, conquerors and educated.

The lack of books that look like their intended audience does have
a cognitive affect, if African children do not see books that have
characters that look like them they cannot vision themselves potentially
growing out of where others want them to stay. This is equally so for
African American children and children of color.

The beauty and power of the Internet is that information is free and
unlimited, there for the taking and learning. African parents if they
are not doing so need to take their children to bookstores to explore
and dream. Empower them with knowledge about literacy, African
authors in the literary world. Imagine the excitement of African
children when they learn a book can help them dream seemingly
impossible dreams, to see their potential as leaders,
visionaries, and content creators.

African Continent
African Continent

Teaching an African child to read is not just a personal investment,
it is an investment in the continent, to build it to the future.
Programs like Sunshine build the needed confidence in its students
to dream beyond their current situations and to see into the future.
Reading builds self-esteem, encourages self-respect and opens mental
doors that connect others with similar passions. A nation that is based
on education is a growing and functional nation with great potential.

Technology opens many doors for collaboration, cooperation and
strengthening education. The integration of technology creates
opportunities for African storytellers to expand their voice, to magnify
their presence and to vocalize the legacy of the people ingrained in the
stories of decades and centuries of old.

Technology allows for diversity to make connections, those of like
cultural backgrounds, and those willing to learn about and make
connections with diverse audiences. Stated by Chinua Achebe,
“Diversity is the engine of evolution, of living things including living
civilizations.”

Social Media if used strategically and planned can
build communities even digitally to magnify the voices
of people, strengthen the collective of the masses
and make effective and long lasting changes that
benefit the continent as a whole and the growing
digital awareness.

Writing and Storytelling for Africans

Image of Africa

Writing and Storytelling for Africans
by William Jackson, M.Ed. @wmjackson Twitter

Aida Correa Catherine Mayokun Egwali William Jackson
Aida Correa Catherine Mayokun Egwali William Jackson

Catherine Mayokun Egwali, center spoke at
WordCamp Jacksonville 2018.
International bestselling author, she also provides
coaching services for those who desire to write,
publish and market their bestsellers on Amazon.

“Writers have to recognize the works of the artist and
those of the activist. Creating content is more than just
throwing words, video, pictures on a digital sheet of
paper. There is serious intellectual thought during the
writing process. Sometimes writing will be in a zone of
creativity and innovation to create new content that has
an intended outcome, but sometimes the outcomes are
unknown.” William Jackson

Professor Soyinka “Just sit down and write….” as he has
stated to growing African writers across the continent.
The ability of a blogger / writer to write also means that
they have a responsibility to tell the story of those that
cannot write, those that are silent and have no voice.
Digital content is powerful and enabling to bring recog-
nition, attention and urgency to civic issues that need
to be addressed.

The growth of the blogger / writer is composed of periods
of growth, reconciliation, enlightenment and a civic
responsibility to write / blog not just for oneself, but for
those that do not have a voice and will not be heard.
The ability to share a story comes from the ability to listen
and apply knowledge from a person’s experiences,
interactions, goals for growth and even how mistakes are
made and learned from.

The diversity of culture influences a writer’s ability to
“touch” the people they are writing to or writing for.
When past writers applied their skills they shared stories
that could be connected to real life, to the experiences
that many knew they could connect to.

The diversity of African bloggers represents the diversity of
a continent that influences not just the global weather, but
has digital extensions that influence business, commerce,
entrepreneurial spirits of the dreamers, creators and
innovators that have ideas to change the world around them.
Africa is in a constant state of flux economically, educationally,
culturally and the future is unknown, but it is becoming
brighter and brighter as business and entrepreneurial
opportunities become available.

Writers like author and Professor Wole Soyinka who are
involved in civic issues, governmental policies and the
educational growth of youth, teens and adults. He
is of the past, but influences the present.
There are modern writers waiting to be read.
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o has been nominated for a Nobel
Peace Prize in 2017 and is a strong contender to win
one in literature.

The African continent has birthed intellectual and
intelligent writers that have embraced and applied
digital platforms to awaken and encourage others in
the African diaspora to spread their digital wings and
take flight. The storytellers of the past have grown and
adapted to the Bloggers, Vbloggers, Podcasters,
Facebook Live and Instagram visionaries building,
creating, designing and posting content that influences
thought not just emotions.

Stated by Soyinka, “when Africans learn the power they
have in their hands in writing, they can influence their
communities and make important and needed changes
because they will have a voice that others can hear and
follow.”

Writing is a grassroots process that builds knowledge in
Africans of all ages and can influence generations. The
educational process is key because as can be seen in Africa
it is dangerous to allow your colonizers to educate your
children. Their goals are not the goals of those being
oppressed. The goal of the oppressor is the keep the
oppressed ignorant. So that their resources can be drained
dry before the oppressed realize what is happening
to their lands, to their people and their very existence.
Stated by Prof. William Jackson of My Quest to Teach
“If we (Blacks) are not speaking for ourselves or writing
for ourselves, someone else is going to describe who we
are, where we came from and ultimately where we are going.”
This creates identity problems because those that are doing
the writing are not looking through the eyes of those being
written about. The people are not seen as people they are
seen as little things with no value, as Chinua Achebe states,
“as funny things.”

Too many stories are wrong in their direction to offer solutions
to issues that Africans are experiencing. Africans must be able
to tell their own stories because there is a story to tell…..
“Your pen has to be on fire.” Chinua Achebe
Social Media has opened more doors to express, share
and even demand change.

Resources:
How many people use social media in Africa?
http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/13/africa/africa-social-media-consumption/

 

WordCamp In Africa – Learning Growing Collaboration

Africa Digital

WordCamp In Africa – Learning Growing Collaboration
William Jackson, M.Ed
WordCamp Organizer, Speaker, KidsCamp Organizer
Past sponsor WordCamp Harare and EdCamp Nigeria

Kids Camp In Africa
Kids Camp In Africa

“In our fast-changing world driven by digital technology,
it is important that every child becomes a creative actor
of localized digital solutions, not its passive consumer”.
@ashuna112 #ACW2019 #AfricaCodeWeek

There is a rapid expansion of WordCamp conferences in Africa,
this magnificent continent of resources both human and
environmental.
WordCamp conferences are seen growing, thriving and
educating people with a passion not just for technology, but
opening doors for business ventures, entrepreneurial opportunities,
unheard of digital collaboration. The opportunities to enable and
empowering African entrepreneurs to share their Brands and find
new Niches and partnerships.

As Blogger, Micro-bloggers, content creator and digital
influencer  for over 15 years, digital impressions expand
based on engagements.  That engagement builds with
the increase of involvement, engagement,
collaboration and sharing content.

WordCamp allows rapid and sustainable growth based on thought
leadership digitally and correspondingly with continued engagement
at MeetUps.  Content creation is only limited by the creative minds that
apply what is learned at WordCamp conferences and the growing number
of KidsCamp and YouthCamp conferences.

WordCamp is a casual and at the same time professional
conference where information is shared related to
WordPress. WP is a free and open source personal publishing
application that powers over 40% of the web.
The immersion of Africa will rapidly increase these numbers and
allow for those African digital innovators to share their talents,
gifts and knowledge.

Africa is expanding the influence of knowledge and applied
knowledge to grow new generations of thought leaders,
digital dreamers, critical thinkers and collaborations that
will take place not just locally, but expand nationally and
across the continent.

Accompanying the traditional WC are KidsCamp and
YouthCamp components that encourage kids from
7yrs to 14yrs and YouthCamp from 15yrs to 17yrs.
There are increased numbers of youth, teens and
young Africans that are starting businesses and
becoming digital innovators, influencers and digital
business owners.

WC conferences build relevant discussions and
information is applicable immediately during
and after the conference. Networking is formidable
because real people with real careers, professions,
businesses, and real dreams are present to share
and help others.

Mentors in multiple areas can be found and the growing
number of Internships helps to provide youth and teens
with real world opportunities to apply and learn skills
to build on.

Meetups allow discussions to be continued and the
building of PLN’s or Professional Learning Networks
that help assist in connections, collaborations
and building networks.

The formats from lectures/presentations, speed talks,
or lightning presentations, panels and interviews.
Presentations are diverse sessions that incorporate slides
and videos that can be accessed from the presenters web
site or through  WordCamp channel on
http://WordPress.tv  after the conference.
The professional development opportunities continue
and can be used at the convenience from home or
through mobile devices.

The building of digital infrastructures that allow
for strong and consistent connections is growing
quickly because of the demands for access.
Access to tech is not a privilege, it has become a right,
as education is a human right, digital access to
educational, business and humanitarian information
is a right of all Africans not matter their educational,
economic, cultural or color. New laws are in place to
make sure access if available and equitable.

As a WordCamp blogger, advocate, speaker, organizer,
volunteer and a the value for the cost of a two day and
the growing three day conference pays for itself.
Africans are seeing that their Brand grows rapidly and
their engagements increase proportionally to following
others on Social Media platforms like Twitter, Instagram
and LinkedIn.

To keep up to date access WordCamp Central and
WordPress TV for relevant and real information.

Resources:
WordCamp Central
https://central.wordcamp.org/

WordPress TV
https://wordpress.tv/

Follow William Jackson and Aida Correa
on the hashtag #thatwordcamplife or #thatwordpresslife

Sharing Ideas to Build African Content Creators

Image of Africa


Sharing Ideas to Build African Content Creators
William Jackson, M.Ed.
The continued growth of African content creators is
being seen in the global expansion of Africans that
are sharing their digital stories.

Whether their stories are personal, professional,
collaborative, political or based on social issues
there are more African bloggers than ever before.
Digital infrastructures are allowing Africans to build
businesses using their cell phones and tablets.
Technology is opening new doors to compete and
collaborate and the world is noticing on Social Media
and digital commerce.

There are many African bloggers not sure how to
start and where to go for help. The availability of
WordCamp conferences and other tech workshops,
meetups and meetings helps tremendously.
Understanding and comprehension of how to apply
content creation is important. Blogging is not and will
not die because of the diversity that is available.

Sharing from my experiences to help bloggers on the
African content are from my experiences as a blogger,
speaker, volunteer, advocate and organizer at WordCamp,
Bar Camp and other tech events.
As a professional educator with a Masters in Technology
with a focus in Educational Technology, Social Media
and STEAM and 30 years of teaching I have seen so much
on the local, national and international levels.

African communities are improving their infrastructures
so the increase is necessary to support the growing number
of users. Resources are valuable to allow for growth
educationally, economically and even socially.



22 Ideas for Growth and Engagement of

African Content Creators
1. Find your calling for content creation, you should
enjoy the process and feel that your accomplishing
something that is coming from your heart and your head.
2. Question your direction in content and where you’re
going. The direction that you are traveling is important
to the stability and growth of your personal and business
life.
3. Use your current skills to build your craft and build
your Brand. Starting is sometimes the hardest part, but
begin and don’t look back.
4. Always participate in learning activities, being a life-long
learner is beneficial because it sets the foundation for
continued learning and growth.
5. Stay true to your Brand, your Brand represents you
and the business you are building.

6. Look at your potential competition as possible future
collaboration. Find common ground to work on and build
a following together. The world is a global economy that
is based on business collaborations.
7. Be proud of who you are and be authentic in your Brand.
8. Don’t be distracted by others and their growth, don’t
imitate others that are growing faster than you, study
their marketing abilities and who is their audience.
9. Embrace your cultural heritage and leverage it to grow,
but always be mindful of the power of embracing diversity.
10. Don’t forget where you came from and how you can
help others grow from their situations and circumstances.
11. Watch your level of articulation and language when
posting content on diverse platforms.
Your words carry power.

12. Be careful how  you share information across cultures,
genders and generations. The language you use can make
or break your Brand and building relationships.
13. Be prepared for trips to libraries for research. Gaining
information to build beyond your opinion, speculation and
perceptions from experiences. 
14. Being involved in Social Media and tech it is important
to always have your devices charged because you never
know when content will be available for your next blog
or video.
15.  Try to put aside your personal ideologies and nuances
that will affect your writing. Distractions must be kept to
a minimum.
16. Write for multiple platforms, diversity helps to bring
about diversity in thinking and looking at things differently.
The TEDTalk “The Danger of a Single Story” is important
to listen to and helps understand potential perceptions.
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is an excellent storyteller.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9Ihs241zeg

17. Check to make sure your writing from the heart and that your writing
not just for yourself, but potential readers.
18. Never forget the humanistic and humanity in your storytelling.
You have a voice that has power so make sure there is a purpose.
19. Look at your attire and the perceptions that you create.
Writing changes as you change in maturity, experience and
relationships. Adapting is important and necessary over time.

20. Surround yourself with people that are growing and moving.
Developing and rising take time, but the foundation can be
made by who and whom you hang out with and collaborate with.
21. Guilt by association is very powerful, be aware of your
associations, relationships, and who you’re seen with.
22. Have your “elevator pitch” ready at all times. You may
end up giving it in the bathroom or the most awkward places
and the rewards can be life changing.